The Percentage game

Posted by Madbot on Jun 26, 2006 in Human Observation, Madbot Madness, Workplace Observation |

Madbot says:

Some people frequently refer to the 80/20 rule to describe situations where 80% of profit comes from 20% of your customers while 20% of profit comes from 80% of the customers – some customers are better than others. Or 80% of your efforts are spent on servicing 20% of your customers while the rest 80% of customers only require 20% of your efforts – some customers require less efforts than others. Your percentage may differ.

I learned that life is really a percentage game – there are no fixed rules, just a % of how much of the overall the “rule” applies to. There are always “exceptions” to the rule and the percentage rule simply states that these exceptions are an integral part of the formula (always present) but simply a minority part of the outcomes.

For example, you may describe that a school or college or company is full of smart people. We all know that this is part of the marketing and while the people from this organisation may be mostly smart, you will undoubtedly still always find some idiots in their ranks – it’s just that the total number of idiots may form a lower percentage of the general population than an average school or college or company. And therefore the percentage game.

What organisations do to manage this percentage (if they are aware of it) is to implement systems that help filter out certain types of people who don’t “fit”. Systems such as an IQ test to discover your likely level of intelligence, face to face interviews to see if you fit with the team, etc. They aim to increase the % of the people they like and in the process reduce the % of the people they don’t like. Again, systems are not all perfect and they are only x% successful – and therefore you will still have x% of people getting through the system.

Organisations can then put in more safeguards by implementing systems instructing people to behave in certain ways – training, manuals, incentives to achieve the company goals, etc to reduce the chances of people acting like idiots.

This percentage game applies to EVERYTHING. Last time you bought a Mitsubishi car and it turned out to be a lemon? Does this mean that all Mitsubishi cars are lemons? Probably but likely it is a percentage game. The percentage of their cars being lemons may be higher or lower depending on your experience and perception but unlikely to be 100%. The exceptions must exist.

When that terrorist organization first made it big time by destroying the WTO (conspiracy theories aside), many people speculate that this is these guys are smart, well organized, and they meant business – otherwise how could they infiltrate the safeguards in the system to do what they did. All I could think of was that this is still a percentage game. These people may have a higher percentage of better organised or higher intelligent people – but there must still idiots there.

There was a recent video recording of the no.2 leader from this organisation (who is now deceased) looking mean by firing machine guns demonstrating his strength (?) and leet skillz – except the opposing faction soon pointed out that the ex-no.2 leader fumbled and didn’t hold the weapon correctly – and therefore his shots were uncontrolled and going everywhere. Probably killed a few innocent camels. Last but not least some poor guy who took the gun from him had his hands burnt from not realising the gun barrels were hot. The percentage rule applies again.

So the next time you deal with a company who’s supposed to be smart, a government agency, or some other organisation, just remember – which % is it that you’re dealing with now..

2 Comments

admiço da cunha leão
Jun 30, 2006 at 10:15 am

eu preciso de um programa que converta arquivos de imagens de estençao vnt para jpg ou outros????


 
Madbot
Jun 30, 2006 at 10:28 am

Admilco,

For converting VNT, look at this post:)

http://www.madbot.org/index.php?p=4


 

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